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impt Testing Guide

This additional guide is intended for developers and testers who use impt to test Squirrel libraries and code with unit tests which are created using the impUnit test framework. impt supersedes the previous version of impTest by integrating a new version of the impTest code.

Contents

What’s New

The main differences between impt and the legacy tool, impTest:

  • impTest is now integrated into impt.
  • impt uses the impCentral™ API.
  • Individual devices are no longer specified. All Devices assigned to the specified Device Group are used for tests.
  • impTest commands have been re-designed and follow the general syntax and design of impt commands.
  • impTest commands are less interactive — all settings are now specified as command options.

Overview

This guide contains two main parts:

Terminology

A ‘test file’ is a file containing ‘test cases’.

A test case is a class inheriting from the ImpTestCase class defined by the impUnit framework. There can be several test cases in a test file.

A ‘test method’ (or simply called a ‘test’) is one of a test case’s methods. It should be prefixed by test, eg. testEverythingOk(). There can be several test methods (tests) in a test case.

Every test may be uniquely identified or specified by the corresponding test file name, test case name and test method name.

A ‘test project’ is an entity which combines test files intended to test a Squirrel library or other Squirrel code. Each test project is defined by one ‘test configuration’, which is embodied in a ‘test configuration file’. A test configuration indicates the test files which are part of the test project; the Device Group to which test devices are assigned and the compile test code deployed; the source file(s) with the Squirrel code which is going to be tested; and other settings required to build and run the tests.

There must be only one test configuration file in a directory. Sub-directories may contain test configuration files too but this is not recommended.

The ‘test home’ is the directory where the test configuration file is located. All of the files located in the test home and all of its sub-directories are considered as test files belonging to the corresponding test project if their names match the patterns specified in the test configuration.

Note The test project entity has no any relation to the development Project entity described in the impt Development Guide. A Project file and a test configuration file may coexist in the same directory.

A ‘test session’ is a run of a set of tests from one test file on one device. That may include all of the tests from all of the test cases from the test file, or a subset of all the tests in the test file. Running the same set of tests on another device is another test session.

A test session is considered failed if at least one test fails.

Test Commands

The impt tool has a dedicated set of commands which operate with test projects, called Test Commands. For a particular test project, the commands should be called from the test home.

Other impt commands may also be needed during testing, such as commands to assign devices to Device Group.

Writing Tests

Main Rules and Steps

You need to perform the following steps to write your tests:

  1. Define the structure of your test files and test cases. This depends entirely on the design of your tests and on the functionality you are testing.
  • You may combine all test cases in one test file or divide them into different test files.
  • You may combine all test files in one directory, or put some or all files into sub-directories. A test project can include test files from the test project home and all its sub-directories.
  1. Define the names of your test files. In general, a test file may have any name but should follow a few rules:
  • A file is assumed to contain agent code if agent is present in its file name, otherwise it is assumed to contain device code.
  • By default, all the test cases in a test file run either on a device or an agent. If your test cases are intended to run on both device and agent, please use the approach described here.
  • A test configuration has a pattern for the location and the names of the test files included in the test project. You specify this pattern during test configuration. You should have this pattern in mind when you name your test files.
  • The files are chosen for execution by the tool in an arbitrary order.
  1. Add test cases to your test files.
  • A test case is a class derived from the ImpTestCase class defined by the impUnit framework.
  • A test file may have more than one test case.
  • There are no rules for test case naming. Test cases may have identical names if they are in different test files. But bear in mind that running selective tests can have an impact on test case naming.
  • The test cases from one test file are chosen for execution by the tool in an arbitrary order.
  1. Add test methods (tests) to your test cases.
  • Every test method name should start with test. Test methods may have identical names if they are in different test cases. There are no other rules for test method naming, but bear in mind that running selective tests can have an impact on test method naming.
  • A test case may have several test methods (tests).
  • Additionally, any test case may have setUp() and tearDown() methods:
    • If it exists, setUp() is called by the tool before any other methods in the test case. It may be used to perform environment setup before test execution.
    • If it exists, tearDown() is called by the tool after all other methods in the test case. It may be used to clean the environment after test execution.
  • All test methods other than setUp() and tearDown() in one test case are chosen for execution by the tool in an arbitrary order, ie. your tests should be independent and not assume any particular order of execution.

A test method may be run synchronously (the default) or asynchronously.

You can use the Builder language in your tests; please find further details here.

A test file must not contain any #require statements. Instead, an include from GitHub should be used.

Tests may call external (eg. a host operating system) commands; please find further details here.

Assertions and diagnostic messages are also available for your tests.

Example

class MyTestCase extends ImpTestCase {
    function testAssertTrue() {
        this.assertTrue(true);
    }

    function testAssertEqual() {
        this.assertEqual(1000 * 0.01, 100 * 0.1);
    }
}

Tests for Bi-directional Device-Agent Communication

It is possible to test an interaction between device and agent by emulating one side of the interaction.

A test file is intended to test either device or agent code, so the opposite side is emulated by code stored in a ‘partner file’. There are several rules for these:

  • A partner file must not contain any test cases. It should only contain the Squirrel code needed to emulate the interaction, eg. the agent.on() code that handles messages sent by device.send() in your agent code tests.
  • The test file and the partner file should be located in the same directory.
  • The test file and the partner file should have similar names according to the following pattern: TestFileName.(agent|device)[.test].nut:
    • The both files should have the same TestFileName prefix and the same .nut suffix.
    • The file intended for the device should contain .device in the name; the file intended for the agent should contain .agent in the name.
    • The test file should contain .test in the name; the partner file must not contain .test in the name.

For example, "Test1.agent.test.nut" (a test file with test cases for agent code) would be partnered with "Test1.device.nut" (the corresponding partner file with emulation of the device side of the interaction).

Note It is sufficient that only the test file is selected for the run, ie. it satisfies the test file search pattern defined during test configuration. The corresponding partner file will be added to the test session automatically.

Example

Test file "Test1.agent.test.nut":

class MyTestCase extends ImpTestCase {
    _myVar = null;

    function setUp() {
        device.on("data", function(data) {
            _myVar = data;
        }.bindenv(this));
    }

    function testMe() {
        local myFunc = null;
        return Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
            myFunc = function() {
                if (_myVar == null) {
                    imp.wakeup(1.0, myFunc);
                } else if (_myVar == "Hello from the device") {
                    resolve();
                } else {
                    reject();
                }
            }.bindenv(this);
            imp.wakeup(1.0, myFunc);
        }.bindenv(this));
    }
}

The corresponding partner file "Test1.device.nut":

imp.wakeup(5.0, function() {
    agent.send("data", "Hello from the dDevice");
});

Asynchronous Testing

Every test method, including setUp() and tearDown(), can be run either synchronously (the default) or asynchronously.

Test methods should return an instance of the Promise class if it needs to do some work asynchronously. The resolution of the Promise indicates that the test has been passed. The rejection of the Promise denotes a failure.

Example

function testSomethingAsynchronously() {
    return Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        resolve("It's all good, man!");
    });
}

Builder Usage

The Builder Language

You can use the Builder language in your tests. It combines a preprocessor with an expression language and advanced imports. For example:

@set assertText = "Failed to assert that values are"

this.assertEqual(
    expected,
    actual,
        "@{assertText}"
        + " equal in '@{__FILE__}'"
        + " at line @{__LINE__}"
    );

__FILE__ and __LINE__ variables are defined by Builder. They can be useful for debugging:

this.assertEqual(
    expected,
    actual,
    "Failed to assert that values are"
        + " equal in '@{__FILE__}'"
        + " at line @{__LINE__}"
);

Builder Variables

It is possible to define and propagate custom variables through a separate configuration file. The syntax of this file is:

{ "pollServer": "http://example.com",
  "expectedAnswer": "data ready" }

This allows Builder to process custom variables used in the source code:

local response = http.get("@{pollServer}", {}).sendsync();
this.assertEqual(
    "@{expectedAnswer}",
    response,
    "Failed to get expected answer"
);

You create and manage the file containing your Builder variables manually. You may locate it anywhere. The file is specified during test configuration.

Include From GitHub

Source code and libraries from GitHub may be included in your test files by using Builder’s @include statement, which you should use instead of the #require statement.

For example: #require "messagemanager.class.nut:2.0.0" should be replaced with @include "github:electricimp/MessageManager/MessageManager.class.nut@v2.0.0".

Builder Cache

Builder’s cache is designed to improve the build time and reduce the number of requests issued to external resources. It is only possible to cache external libraries. Builder stores the cache in the .builder-cache sub-directory inside the test project directory. The cache is maintained for up to 24 hours to prevent library code from becoming stale.

Cacheing is disabled by default. It can be enabled during test configuration. It is possible to clear the cache when you run the tests.

External Commands

A test can call a host operating system command as follows:

// Within the test case/method
this.runCommand("echo 123");
// The host operating system command `echo 123` is executed

If the execution times out (specified during test configuration) or the external command exits with a status code other than 0, the test session fails.

Assertions

The following assertions are available in tests:

assertTrue()

this.assertTrue(condition[, message]);

Asserts that the condition is truthful.

Example

// OK
this.assertTrue(1 == 1);

// Fails
this.assertTrue(1 == 2);

assertEqual()

this.assertEqual(expected, actual[, message])

Asserts that two values are equal.

Example

// OK
this.assertEqual(1000 * 0.01, 100 * 0.1);

// Failure: Expected value: 1, got: 2
this.assertEqual(1, 2);

assertGreater()

this.assertGreater(actual, cmp[, message])

Asserts that a value is greater than some other value.

Example

// OK
this.assertGreater(1, 0);

// Failure: Failed to assert that 1 > 2
this.assertGreater(1, 2);

assertLess()

this.assertLess(actual, cmp[, message])

Asserts that a value is less than some other value.

Example

// OK
this.assertLess(0, 1);

// Failure: Failed to assert that 2 < 2
this.assertLess(2, 2);

assertClose()

this.assertClose(expected, actual, maxDiff[, message])

Asserts that a value is within a specified range of an expected value.

Example

// OK
this.assertClose(10, 9, 2);

// Failure: Expected value: 10±0.5, got: 9
this.assertClose(10, 9, 0.5);

assertDeepEqual()

this.assertDeepEqual(expected, actual[, message])

Performs a deep comparison of tables, arrays and classes.

Example

// OK
this.assertDeepEqual({"a" : { "b" : 1 }}, {"a" : { "b" : 0 }});

// Failure: Missing slot [a.b] in actual value
this.assertDeepEqual({"a" : { "b" : 1 }}, {"a" : { "_b" : 0 }});

// Failure: Extra slot [a.c] in actual value
this.assertDeepEqual({"a" : { "b" : 1 }}, {"a" : { "b" : 1, "c": 2 }});

// Failure: At [a.b]: expected "1", got "0"
this.assertDeepEqual({"a" : { "b" : 1 }}, {"a" : { "b" : 0 }});

assertBetween()

this.assertBetween(actual, from, to[, message])

Asserts that a value belongs to the range from from to to.

Example

// OK
this.assertBetween(10, 9, 11);

// Failure: Expected value in the range of 11..12, got 10
this.assertBetween(10, 11, 12);

assertThrowsError

this.assertThrowsError(func, ctx[, args = []][, message])

Asserts that the function func throws an error when it is called with the arguments args and the context ctx. Returns an error thrown by func.

Example

// OK, returns "abc"
this.assertThrowsError(function (a) {
    throw a;
}, this, ["abc"]);

// Failure: Function was expected to throw an error
this.assertThrowsError(function () {
    // Throw "error";
}, this);

Diagnostic Messages

There are three ways to display diagnostic messages in the console from your tests:

  • Call this.info(<message>); from a test method, as many times as you need.
  • For synchronous tests, call return <return_value>; from a test method. The returned value will be displayed in the console, provided it is not null and the test succeeds.
  • For asynchronous tests, call Promise resolution or rejection methods with a value resolve(<return_value>); or reject(<return_value>);. The returned value will be displayed on the console, provided it is not null.

Examples of tests output are provided in the section on running tests.

A Test Case Example

The utility file myFile.nut contains the following code:

// (optional) Async version, can also be synchronous
function setUp() {
    return Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        resolve("We're ready");
    }.bindenv(this));
}

The test case code is as follows:

class TestCase1 extends ImpTestCase {

@include __PATH__+"/myFile.nut"

    // Sync test method
    function testSomethingSync() {
        this.assertTrue(true);    // OK
        this.assertTrue(false);   // Fails
    }

    // Async test method
    function testSomethingAsync() {
        return Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
            // Return in 2 seconds
            imp.wakeup(2 /* 2 seconds */, function() {
                resolve("something useful");
            }.bindenv(this));
        }.bindenv(this));
    }

    // (optional) Teardown method - cleans up after the test
    function tearDown() {
        // Clean-up here
    }
}

Using Tests

Test Device Group

To run your tests you need to have one or more devices associated with your account and assigned to the Device Group to which your tests will be deployed. These then are the tasks you should perform in order to prepare your devices for testing:

  1. Prepare a Product. If you already have a Product, note its ID or name. If you do not have a Product, create a new one with impt product create:
> impt product create --name MyTestProduct
Product "MyTestProduct" is created successfully.
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS
  1. Prepare a Device Group. If you already have a Device Group, note its ID or name. If you do not have a Device Group, create a new one with impt dg create. You need to specify the Product when creating the Device Group. You may use a Device Group of any type, but it is recommended that you use a Development Device Group.

    > impt dg create --name MyTestDG --product MyTestProduct
    Device Group "MyTestDG" is created successfully.
    IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS
    
  2. Assign one or more devices on which you plan to run your tests to the Device Group using impt device assign.

    Example

    > impt device assign --device myDevice1 --dg MyTestDG
    Device "myDevice1" is assigned successfully to Device Group "MyTestDG".
    IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS
    
  3. Specify the Device Group during test configuration. Your tests will run on all the devices assigned to the Device Group. If you need to, you can change the Device Group in the test configuration.

Test Configuration

Before running the tests you should create a test configuration for your test project: call impt test create from the test home. If a test configuration file already exists in that directory, it will be deleted (if confirmed by you) and the new configuration will be created from scratch in its place.

The configuration settings include:

  • --dg — the Device Group identifier. Your tests will run on all of the devices assigned to that Device Group. You may specify the Device Group by its ID or its name.

  • --device-file, --agent-file — The device and agent source code which is deployed along with the tests. Usually, it is the source code of a library or other Squirrel which you are planning to test.

  • --test-file — The test file name or the pattern which specifies the test file(s) included in your test project. You may repeat this option to specify several file names and/or patterns. The values of the repeated option are combined by logical OR. The default pattern is detailed in the command’s spec.

  • --github-config — A path to a GitHub credentials file. You may need to use it if your test files use include from GitHub.

  • --builder-config — A path to a file containing Builder variables. You only need it if your tests use Builder variables.

  • --timeout, --stop-on-fail, --allow-disconnect, --builder-cache — Other settings, their meaning and default values are described in the command’s spec.

Example

> impt test create --dg MyTestDG --agent-file MyLibrary.agent.lib.nut
Test Configuration File is created successfully.
Test Configuration info:
Test files:       *.test.nut, tests/**/*.test.nut
Agent file:       MyLibrary.agent.lib.nut
Stop on failure:  false
Timeout:          30
Allow disconnect: false
Builder cache:    false
Device Group:
  id:      e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99
  type:    development
  name:    MyTestDG
  Product:
    id:   a83ecc00-cb39-d950-9a60-96694403ab9d
    name: MyTestProduct
  Devices:
    Device:
      id:            234776801163a9ee
      name:          myDevice1
      mac_address:   0c:2a:69:05:0d:62
      agent_id:      T1oUmIZ3At_N
      device_online: true
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

Updating the Configuration

You may update the test configuration by calling impt test update. The existing test configuration file will be updated with the new settings. The new --test-file option value(s) completely replace any existing setting.

Example

> impt test update --timeout 60 --builder-cache true
Test Configuration File is updated successfully.
Test Configuration info:
Test files:       *.test.nut, tests/**/*.test.nut
Agent file:       MyLibrary.agent.lib.nut
Stop on failure:  false
Timeout:          60
Allow disconnect: false
Builder cache:    true
Device Group:
  id:      e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99
  type:    development
  name:    MyTestDG
  Product:
    id:   a83ecc00-cb39-d950-9a60-96694403ab9d
    name: MyTestProduct
  Devices:
    Device:
      id:            234776801163a9ee
      name:          myDevice1
      mac_address:   0c:2a:69:05:0d:62
      agent_id:      T1oUmIZ3At_N
      device_online: true
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

You may also display the current test configuration by calling impt test info.

Example

> impt test info
Test Configuration info:
Test files:       *.test.nut, tests/**/*.test.nut
Agent file:       MyLibrary.agent.lib.nut
Stop on failure:  false
Timeout:          60
Allow disconnect: false
Builder cache:    true
Device Group:
  id:      e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99
  type:    development
  name:    MyTestDG
  Product:
    id:   a83ecc00-cb39-d950-9a60-96694403ab9d
    name: MyTestProduct
  Devices:
    Device:
      id:            234776801163a9ee
      name:          myDevice1
      mac_address:   0c:2a:69:05:0d:62
      agent_id:      T1oUmIZ3At_N
      device_online: true
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

GitHub Credentials

These may be needed if your test files include code from GitHub.

For unauthenticated requests, the GitHub API allows you to make up to 60 requests per hour, but this may be not sufficient for intensive testing. To overcome this limit, you can provide GitHub account credentials. There are two ways to do this:

  • Via environment variables We strongly recommend this way for security reasons — You should specify two environment variables:

    • GITHUB_USER — A GitHub account username.
    • GITHUB_TOKEN — A GitHub account password or personal access token.
  • Via a GitHub credentials file.

    • This file may be created or updated with impt test github. You specify a GitHub username and password, and they are saved in the specified file. Important The credentials are stored in a plain text.
    • You may have several GitHub credential files and they may be located in any place. You specify a concrete GitHub credentials file during test configuration. If the specified file exists when you run the tests, the GitHub credentials are taken from it. If the specified file does not exist, the GitHub credentials are taken from the environment variables, if they are set.

Example

> impt test github --github-config github.conf --user github_username
    --pwd github_password
GitHub credentials Configuration File is created successfully.
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

Running Tests

To run your configured test project’s tests, call impt test run from the test home. The tests will be executed according to your test configuration file.

By default, the tool searches for all test files according to the file names and/or patterns specified in the test configuration file. The search starts from the test home and includes all sub-directories. The tool looks for all test cases in the files it discovers. All test methods in all located test cases are considered as viable tests for execution. For a particular run, you may select a subset of test files, test cases and test methods by specifying the --tests option; see here for more details.

Every selected test file is a source for building and deploying code, so there will be as many different builds as there are selected test files for execution. Test files (builds) run in an arbitrary order.

Every test file (build) runs on all devices currently assigned to the Device Group specified in the test configuration file one by one: no device is run until the previous device has completed testing. Devices are chosen in an arbitrary order. A test file (build) running on one device is called a test session. When the build completes on the last device, the next test file (build) starts running on the same set of devices, again one after the other.

Every test is treated as failed if an error is thrown or a timeout, as defined in the test configuration file, occurs during the test execution. Otherwise the test is treated as passed. If at least one test in a test session fails, the test session is treated as failed. If the test configuration has the stop-on-fail setting set to true, test execution ends after the first failed test.

You may clear the Builder cache before the tests starts by setting the --clear-cache option. If the Builder cache is enabled in the test configuration file, it will then be re-created during the test run.

You may run the tests in debug mode by specifying the --debug option.

Example

> impt test run
[info] Started at 22 Jan 2018 22:47:04 GMT+0300
[+0.01/0.01s info] Found 2 test files:
        tests/TestFile1.test.nut
        tests/TestFile2.test.nut
[+0.02/0.00s info] Using agent source file: MyLibrary.agent.lib.nut
[+0.02/0.00s info] Have no device source file, using blank
[+0.63/0.61s info] Using device test file tests/TestFile1.test.nut
[+0.66/0.03s info] Using DeviceGroup MyTestDG [e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99]
Deployment "2587b907-afa7-8c72-a4a5-a8f0407018b5" is created successfully.
[+1.83/1.17s info] Created deployment: 2587b907-afa7-8c72-a4a5-a8f0407018b5

[+1.83/0.00s info] Starting test session eight-inside
[+1.83/0.00s info] Using device myDevice1 [234776801163a9ee] (1/1)
[+1.83/0.00s info] Using device test file tests/TestFile1.test.nut
Restart request for Device "234776801163a9ee" is successful.
[+5.00/3.17s info] Device code space usage: 16.8%
[+9.12/4.12s test] MyTestCase_1::testMe()
[+9.13/0.00s test] Success
[+9.13/0.00s test] MyTestCase_1::testMe_1()
[+9.56/0.43s test] Failure: Failed to assert that condition is true
[+9.56/0.00s test] MyTestCase::testMe()
[+9.56/0.00s test] Success
[+9.57/0.00s test] MyTestCase::testMe_1()
[+9.57/0.01s test] Success
[+9.57/0.00s test] Tests: 4, Assertions: 4, Failures: 1
[+9.58/0.00s info] Session eight-inside failed
[+9.58/0.00s info] Using device test file tests/TestFile2.test.nut
[+9.61/0.03s info] Using DeviceGroup MyTestDG [e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99]
Deployment "3c0ef686-6200-59e1-cc39-ec8ca788a482" is created successfully.
[+10.70/1.09s info] Created deployment: 3c0ef686-6200-59e1-cc39-ec8ca788a482

[+10.70/0.00s info] Starting test session round-angle
[+10.70/0.00s info] Using device myDevice1 [234776801163a9ee] (1/1)
[+10.70/0.00s info] Using device test file tests/TestFile2.test.nut
Restart request for Device "234776801163a9ee" is successful.
[+14.71/4.01s info] Device code space usage: 16.8%
[+18.78/4.07s test] MyTestCase::setUp()
[+18.78/0.00s test] Success: We're ready
[+18.78/0.00s test] MyTestCase::testMe_1()
[+18.78/0.00s test] Success
[+19.23/0.45s test] MyTestCase::testMe()
[+19.23/0.01s test] Failure: Expected value: 1, got: 10
[+19.23/0.00s test] Tests: 2, Assertions: 2, Failures: 1
[+19.24/0.00s info] Session round-angle failed

[+19.24/0.00s info] Testing failed
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

Running Selective Tests

The --tests <testcase_pattern> option of the impt test run command allows you to select specific test files, test cases and test methods for execution. The syntax of <testcase_pattern> is the [testFile][:testCase][::testMethod], where:

  • testFile is the name of a test file. May include a relative path. May include regular expressions like .*, etc. The specified file(s) will be selected from all files which correspond to the file names and/or patterns defined in the test configuration. If testFile is omitted, all files which correspond to the file name or patterns defined in the test configuration are selected.

  • testCase is the name of a test case. Should be fully qualified. Test cases with an identical name may exist in different test files; in this situation all of them will be selected if the files are selected.

  • testMethod is the name of a test method. Should be fully qualified. Test methods with an identical name may exist in different test cases; in this situation all of them will be selected if the cases are selected.

Example

A test file TestFile1.test.nut contains:

class MyTestCase extends ImpTestCase {
    function testMe() {...}
    function testMe_1() {...}
}

class MyTestCase_1 extends ImpTestCase {
    function testMe() {...}
    function testMe_1() {...}
}

A test file TestFile2.test.nut contains:

class MyTestCase extends ImpTestCase {
    function testMe() {...}
    function testMe_1() {...}
}

In this example:

  • --tests TestFile1:MyTestCase::testMe selects the testMe() method in the MyTestCase case from the TestFile1.test.nut file.
  • --tests :MyTestCase::testMe selects the testMe() method in the MyTestCase case from both TestFile1.test.nut and TestFile2.test.nut.
  • --tests :MyTestCase_1 selects all the test methods from the MyTestCase_1 case from the TestFile1.test.nut file as it is the only file containing the specified test case.
  • --tests TestFile2 selects all the test methods from the TestFile2.test.nut file.
  • --tests ::testMe_1 selects the testMe_1() methods in all test cases from both TestFile1.test.nut and TestFile2.test.nut.

Debug Mode

You may run your tests in debug mode by specifying the --debug option of the impt test run command. In this mode:

  • All communications with the impCentral API are displayed in the console.
  • All communications with the impUnit test framework are displayed in the console.
  • Device and agent code for all the running builds are placed in the .build folder inside the test home.

Example

> impt test run --tests TestFile1:MyTestCase::testMe --debug
...
[info] Started at 22 Jan 2018 22:49:25 GMT+0300
[debug:TestHelper] Skipping found test tests/TestFile2.test.nut
[debug:TestHelper] Test files found: [ { name: 'tests/TestFile1.test.nut',
    path: 'C:\\impt\\test\\tests\\TestFile1.test.nut',
    type: 'device' } ]
[+0.02/0.02s info] Found 1 test file:
        tests/TestFile1.test.nut
[debug:TestHelper] Agent source code file path: MyLibrary.agent.lib.nut
[+0.03/0.00s info] Using agent source file: MyLibrary.agent.lib.nut
[+0.03/0.00s info] Have no device source file, using blank
...
[+1.16/1.13s info] Using device test file tests/TestFile1.test.nut
[debug:TestHelper] Agent code size: 53 bytes
[debug:TestHelper] Device code size: 22207 bytes
[+1.19/0.04s info] Using DeviceGroup MyTestDG [e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99]
...
Deployment "e46e138c-9053-db40-e9de-f299e7c2908e" is created successfully.
[+3.04/1.85s info] Created deployment: e46e138c-9053-db40-e9de-f299e7c2908e

[+3.04/0.00s info] Starting test session paint-influence
[+3.05/0.00s info] Using device myDevice1 [234776801163a9ee] (1/1)
[+3.05/0.00s info] Using device test file tests/TestFile1.test.nut
[debug:TestHelper] Agent code size: 53 bytes
[debug:TestHelper] Device code size: 22207 bytes
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "session-start" started
...
Doing the request with options:
{
  "url": "https://api.electricimp.com/v5/devices/234776801163a9ee/restart",
  "method": "POST",
  "headers": {
    "Content-type": "application/vnd.api+json",
    "Authorization": "[hidden]"
  },
  "json": true,
  "qs": null,
  "body": null,
  "qsStringifyOptions": {
    "arrayFormat": "repeat"
  }
}

Response code: 204
Response body: undefined
Restart request for Device "234776801163a9ee" is successful.
[debug:TestSession] Device restarted
[debug:TestLogsParser] Log line received: {"device_id":"234776801163a9ee","ts":"2018-01-22T19:49:30.423Z","log_type":"development","type":"status","msg":"Agent restarted: reload."}
[debug:TestLogsParser] Log line received: {"device_id":"234776801163a9ee","ts":"2018-01-22T19:49:30.673Z","log_type":"development","type":"status","msg":"Agent restarted: new_bytecode_version."}
[debug:TestLogsParser] Log line received: {"device_id":"234776801163a9ee","ts":"2018-01-22T19:49:30.667Z","log_type":"development","type":"status","msg":"Downloading new code; 16.83% program storage used"}
[+6.35/3.30s info] Device code space usage: 16.8%
[debug:TestLogsParser] Log line received: {"device_id":"234776801163a9ee","ts":"2018-01-22T19:49:34.917Z","log_type":"development","type":"server.log","msg":"{\"type\":\"SESSION_START\",\"__IMPUNIT__\":1,\"session\":\"paint-influence\",\"message\":\"\"}"}
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" stopped
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" started
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "session-start" stopped
[debug:TestLogsParser] Log line received: {"device_id":"234776801163a9ee","ts":"2018-01-22T19:49:34.937Z","log_type":"development","type":"server.log","msg":"{\"type\":\"DEBUG\",\"__IMPUNIT__\":1,\"session\":\"paint-influence\",\"message\":{\"testCasesFound\":{\"MyTestCase\":{\"tests\":[\"testMe\"],\"tearDown\":false,\"setUp\":false}}}}"}
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" stopped
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" started
[debug:TestLogsParser] Log line received: {"device_id":"234776801163a9ee","ts":"2018-01-22T19:49:34.951Z","log_type":"development","type":"server.log","msg":"{\"type\":\"TEST_START\",\"__IMPUNIT__\":1,\"session\":\"paint-influence\",\"message\":\"MyTestCase::testMe()\"}"}
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" stopped
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" started
[+10.50/4.15s test] MyTestCase::testMe()
[debug:TestLogsParser] Log line received: {"device_id":"234776801163a9ee","ts":"2018-01-22T19:49:34.962Z","log_type":"development","type":"server.log","msg":"{\"type\":\"TEST_OK\",\"__IMPUNIT__\":1,\"session\":\"paint-influence\",\"message\":null}"}
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" stopped
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" started
[+10.50/0.00s test] Success
[debug:TestLogsParser] Log line received: {"device_id":"234776801163a9ee","ts":"2018-01-22T19:49:34.976Z","log_type":"development","type":"server.log","msg":"{\"type\":\"SESSION_RESULT\",\"__IMPUNIT__\":1,\"session\":\"paint-influence\",\"message\":{\"assertions\":1,\"failures\":0,\"tests\":1}}"}
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" stopped
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" started
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" stopped
[+10.51/0.01s info] Tests: 1, Assertions: 1, Failures: 0
[+10.51/0.00s info] Session paint-influence succeeded
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "session-start" stopped
[debug:TestWatchdog] Watchdog "test-messages" stopped

[+10.51/0.00s info] Testing succeeded
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

Cleaning Up

After testing is complete, you may want to clean the various entities created during testing. If you want to delete your test project, call impt test delete from the test home. This deletes the test configuration file, the Builder cache directory and any debug information. By specifying additional options you may also delete the GitHub credentials file, any file containing Builder variables, and impCentral API entities (Device Group, Deployments, Product) which were used or created during testing. Please see the delete command’s spec for more information.

Example

> impt test delete --all
The following entities will be deleted:
Product:
  id:   a83ecc00-cb39-d950-9a60-96694403ab9d
  name: MyTestProduct
Device Group:
  id:   e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99
  type: development
  name: MyTestDG
Deployment:
  id:  e46e138c-9053-db40-e9de-f299e7c2908e
  sha: 6b2c3c2f7eb406dd0aa035ac4b7544cff6fa5b2eebf2c2317bcca8a30d5545da
Deployment:
  id:  f44511f9-f1a0-a892-a4b8-53f48880d6c7
  sha: c56bd6d4723170c8022401461036fff2c2a86f9dc43e84613c42068abd667c6c
Deployment:
  id:  3c0ef686-6200-59e1-cc39-ec8ca788a482
  sha: 2f45a6f13ffa6e1ef201429583f9d758da0b6cb9939e663bb278f7270f036220

The following Devices will be unassigned from Device Groups:
Device:
  id:            234776801163a9ee
  name:          myDevice1
  mac_address:   0c:2a:69:05:0d:62
  agent_id:      T1oUmIZ3At_N
  device_online: true

Debug mode temporary .build directory will be deleted.
GitHub credentials Configuration File github.conf will be deleted.
Test Configuration File in the current directory will be deleted.
Are you sure you want to continue?
Enter 'y' (yes) or 'n' (no): y

Device "234776801163a9ee" is unassigned successfully.
Device Group "e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99" is deleted successfully.
Product "a83ecc00-cb39-d950-9a60-96694403ab9d" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "e46e138c-9053-db40-e9de-f299e7c2908e" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "3c0ef686-6200-59e1-cc39-ec8ca788a482" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "f44511f9-f1a0-a892-a4b8-53f48880d6c7" is deleted successfully.
Debug mode temporary .build directory is deleted successfully.
GitHub credentials Configuration is deleted successfully.
Test Configuration is deleted successfully.
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

Alternatively, you may fully delete the Device Group which you used for the testing by calling impt dg delete --dg <DEVICE_GROUP_IDENTIFIER> --builds --force. This fully cleans all of the impCentral entities created during testing, unassigns all devices from the Device Group, deletes all builds created for the Device Group, and deletes the Device Group itself.

Example

> impt dg delete --dg MyTestDG --builds --force
The following entities will be deleted:
Device Group:
  id:   e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99
  type: development
  name: MyTestDG
Deployment:
  id:  e46e138c-9053-db40-e9de-f299e7c2908e
  sha: 6b2c3c2f7eb406dd0aa035ac4b7544cff6fa5b2eebf2c2317bcca8a30d5545da
Deployment:
  id:  f44511f9-f1a0-a892-a4b8-53f48880d6c7
  sha: c56bd6d4723170c8022401461036fff2c2a86f9dc43e84613c42068abd667c6c
Deployment:
  id:  3c0ef686-6200-59e1-cc39-ec8ca788a482
  sha: 2f45a6f13ffa6e1ef201429583f9d758da0b6cb9939e663bb278f7270f036220

The following Devices will be unassigned from Device Groups:
Device:
  id:            234776801163a9ee
  name:          myDevice1
  mac_address:   0c:2a:69:05:0d:62
  agent_id:      T1oUmIZ3At_N
  device_online: true

Are you sure you want to continue?
Enter 'y' (yes) or 'n' (no): y

Device "234776801163a9ee" is unassigned successfully.
Device Group "e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "e46e138c-9053-db40-e9de-f299e7c2908e" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "3c0ef686-6200-59e1-cc39-ec8ca788a482" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "f44511f9-f1a0-a892-a4b8-53f48880d6c7" is deleted successfully.
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

If you only want to unassign the devices from the testing Device Group, use impt dg unassign or impt device unassign.

Example

> impt dg unassign --dg MyTestDG
The following Devices are unassigned successfully from Device Group "MyTestDG":
Device:
  id:            234776801163a9ee
  name:          myDevice1
  mac_address:   0c:2a:69:05:0d:62
  agent_id:      T1oUmIZ3At_N
  device_online: true
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS
> impt device unassign --device myDevice1
Device "myDevice1" is unassigned successfully.
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS

If you want to delete the Product, use impt product delete.

Example

> impt product delete --product MyTestProduct --builds --force
The following entities will be deleted:
Product:
  id:   a83ecc00-cb39-d950-9a60-96694403ab9d
  name: MyTestProduct
Device Group:
  id:   e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99
  type: development
  name: MyTestDG
Deployment:
  id:  e46e138c-9053-db40-e9de-f299e7c2908e
  sha: 6b2c3c2f7eb406dd0aa035ac4b7544cff6fa5b2eebf2c2317bcca8a30d5545da
Deployment:
  id:  f44511f9-f1a0-a892-a4b8-53f48880d6c7
  sha: c56bd6d4723170c8022401461036fff2c2a86f9dc43e84613c42068abd667c6c
Deployment:
  id:  3c0ef686-6200-59e1-cc39-ec8ca788a482
  sha: 2f45a6f13ffa6e1ef201429583f9d758da0b6cb9939e663bb278f7270f036220

The following Devices will be unassigned from Device Groups:
Device:
  id:            234776801163a9ee
  name:          myDevice1
  mac_address:   0c:2a:69:05:0d:62
  agent_id:      T1oUmIZ3At_N
  device_online: true

Are you sure you want to continue?
Enter 'y' (yes) or 'n' (no): y

Device "234776801163a9ee" is unassigned successfully.
Device Group "e4bf84dd-7cc6-147e-9b42-b08812912b99" is deleted successfully.
Product "a83ecc00-cb39-d950-9a60-96694403ab9d" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "e46e138c-9053-db40-e9de-f299e7c2908e" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "3c0ef686-6200-59e1-cc39-ec8ca788a482" is deleted successfully.
Deployment "f44511f9-f1a0-a892-a4b8-53f48880d6c7" is deleted successfully.
IMPT COMMAND SUCCEEDS